Széchenyi medicinal baths (Széchenyi gyógyfürdő) by day

Széchenyi medicinal baths (Széchenyi gyógyfürdő) by day

The Széchenyi medicinal baths (Széchenyi gyógyfürdő), or just Széchenyi baths (Széchenyi fürdő) as it is often called, is the largest medicinal bath in Europe. Located in City Park (Városliget), next to the Budapest Zoo (Állatkert), the Széchenyi baths were built in 1913 by Győző Czigler in Neo-baroque style. The water is supplied by two thermal springs, with temperatures of 74°F/23°C and 77°F/25°C, respectively.

A Széchenyi medicinal baths (Széchenyi gyógyfürdő) indoor pool

A Széchenyi medicinal baths (Széchenyi gyógyfürdő) indoor pool

The baths were named after Count István Széchenyi (Gróf Széchenyi István). István Széchenyi was a 19th century Hungarian politician, nobleman and reformer often referred to as ‘the greatest Hungarian’. The Széchenyi Chain bridge (Széchenyi lánchíd) was also proposed by and named after him.

The baths were expanded in 1927 with a public bathing department for gentlemen and ladies as well as a beach site. In the middle of the 1960s, further transformations took place, including the creation of a group thermal section in bathing suits as well as a daytime outpatient hospital (complex physiotherapy department).

Challenge the chess champs in the outdoor pools

Challenge the chess champs in the outdoor pools

The baths attract locals and tourists alike, no matter what the weather, but they get especially busy on summer weekends. They also attract all ages from children enjoying the whirlpools to the older generation enjoying a game of chess in the water. There are saunas, steam rooms, massage rooms and a host of different temperature pools inside and out making the Széchenyi baths a perfect way to spend time recovering from a party or relaxing after a hard week. For me the baths are most beautiful at night during the winter when they take on an ethereal quality with the clouds of steam rising to be illuminated by the old lamps.

The baths are open from 6am until 10 pm (with some services only running until 7pm, or not being offered on weekends). Please check here for up to date information on all opening hours at Széchenyi baths.

Ticket costs for a weekday/weekend are 3,000/3,100 HUF (about 11 Euros) with a locker and 3,400/3,500 (about 13 Euros) with a cabin. If you leave within 2 hours you will get a 300 HUF (about 1 Euro) rebate. For all the prices, including massages and season tickets, click here!

The Széchenyi medicinal baths (Széchenyi gyógyfürdő) at night, in winter

The Széchenyi medicinal baths (Széchenyi gyógyfürdő) at night, in winter

To get to the Széchenyi baths take the Metro line 1 to the Széchenyi Fürdő stop, or take the trolley-buses 72, 75 or 79 to the Állatkert stop, or take the bus 20E, 30, 30A, 105 to the Hősök tere stop and walk. The park has signs to the baths.

Let me know if you have any questions or feedback about the beautiful Széchenyi thermal baths in the comments below.

Destination guide Dan.

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